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A2 Adult B1 Games Past Simple Present Perfect Present Simple Secondary Uncategorised Vocabulary

Tessellation Station!

This is a triangle game, based on Big Potato’s ‘P for Pizza’, which is also a great game for English classes, but students need a reasonable level to play it, so this version is good to get them towards that level, and have a little fun during the long and laborious process of learning irregular verbs.

The cards are double-sided. I have designed the pages so that if you have a printer that does double-sided printing, you can just press go and print all the cards fairly easily. They should line up perfectly, then you can laminate and cut them out. Otherwise, if you print them out single-sided, you can glue the two pieces of paper back-to-back, laminate and cut out as mentioned previously.

You will have 40 cards in total. My cards have Spanish verbs on, but you can change them to the native language of your students. For example, if you are an EAL/EFL teacher in France, you might put the verbs in French for your classes. If you are teaching Arabic students, put the verbs in Arabic etc. The verb side of the cards is editable, so you can change them easily.

 

How to play

Lay out the cards as in the photo.

The card in the centre represents the entire pack, with one card from the top placed on each side.

The idea is that you have to say the verb in the tense stated. For example, in this illustration, players would have to say the past participle of verb 2, the past simple of verb 4 or the present simple of verb 7.

The player who says the correct verb tense any of the 3 verbs first, takes the corresponding card and another card is taken from the top of the deck to replace it.

The winner has more cards at the end of the game.

If you want to encourage students to use all tenses, you can allocate points instead… 1 point for present simple, 2 for past simple and 3 for past participle. Or you could add a rule that you can’t use the same verb tense consecutively. This will stop student that only know present tense meanings cleaning up!

I have included a verb list that you can make available to scaffold students in the earlier stages, or give them to take home and learn the verbs, as being in a position to win might motivate them for self-study!

Downloads

Download the editable word document here : www.classroomgames.net/materials/tessellation-station.docx

Categories
A1 A2 Adult B1 Games Materials Past Simple Present Perfect Primary Reading Secondary Speaking Uncategorised Vocabulary writing

Verbo! An irregular verbs card game based on Uno.

I developed this game to practise irregular verbs and help students learn which verbs go with which.

What to do

Download the printable PDF at the end of the page. Print it off and laminate it. There is a card reverse included in the PDF to print the cards double-sided.

How to play

Students are dealt 7 cards each to start, the rest are left in the centre of the table.

Just as with uno, a student must follow the top card with either a card from the same verb, or a card of the same colour. You could make it more challenging by getting students to define the verb, or use it in a sentence…

If a student can’t put a card down, they must pick one up.

If a student puts down a card from the wrong verb group, they must take it back and pick up two extra cards.

The +2, +4, change direction, change colour and miss-a-turn cards are all the same as the original version.

When the student has 1 card left, they have to shout ‘verbo!’ if they don’t before the next person takes a turn, they must pick up 4 cards.

Pick-up cards can accumulate, just as with Uno.

Download

Download the printable PDF here : http://www.classroomgames.net/materials/verbo-card-game.pdf

Categories
A1 A2 Adult B1 B2 C1 C2 Games Materials Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Simple Present Continuous Present Simple Primary Secondary Speaking

Tenses Rummy

I created this game to do controlled practice of verb tenses in positive, negative and interrogative forms.

Setting up

Print the cards, laminate and cut them out. That’s it!

I have used this with groups of up to 8 players, however if you have bigger groups you may want to print off 2 copies.

You can use these cards in a variety of ways. You can play a rummy type game, where the winner has 3 of one type and 4 of another. I prefer to play with ‘happy families’ rules, as they are simple to understand, so that is what I will explain here.

Playing the game

  1. The cards contain different verbs and pronouns. I have deliberately chosen the most common and irregular verbs. There are 6 cards for each verb. The objective of the game is to collect a set of 3 card of the same verb to gain a point. The aim of the game is to get as many ‘points’ as possible. The pronouns used on the cards are I, you, he, she, we, and they. It is possible to get 2 sets of 3 from each verb.
  2. Students use the pronouns to form the question, so in the ‘Happy Families’ version of the game they don’t have any other use. The important element for the cards is the verb.
  3. Shuffle the cards and deal each student 7. The rest are put in a pile, picture side down, in the centre of the table.
  4. Students choose any other student to ask for a ‘verb’. They may only ask for a verb that they have in their hand. They do so as follows:
    • In this example, the verb card they are looking for is ‘visit’ europe and the tense we are praticing is Present Simple, however you can decide to use any tense for the game.
    • The student will ask using the pronoun they have on their own card, so if they have the card HE – VISIT EUROPE in their hand, the question would be : “Does he visit europe?
    • The other student would need to respond in either the positive, or negative, depending on whether they have any visit europe cards in their hand. “Yes, he visits europe” or “No, he doesn’t visit europe“.
    • With Present simple, you will practise the change in 3rd person Do/Does for questions and Don’t/Doesn’t for negative, plus the 3rd person ‘s’ for positive statements. If you play using Past Simple you will practise the past simple irregular verbs in the positive and use of did + infinitive for negative and questions… etc. Choose your verb tense at the beginning for what your students need to practise.
  5. If the other student has the verb card, they must give it. If they have 2, they must give both of them.
  6. If a student successfully asks and receives a card/cards, they can take another turn. If not, they take a card from the centre pile and play passes to the next left.
  7. Once a set is on the table, it cannot be stolen.
  8. The student with the most sets at the end of the game is the winner.

The game usually lasts a full hour depending on the size of group. The more players, the better the game is. It’s good, as students have to listen to each other to work out who has got which cards.

You can use this game for any verb tense for controlled practice, as repeating the correct sentences in positive, negative and interrogative forms reinforces their understanding. It can fit in with any curriculum and planning.

If you are still unsure how the game works, I will be posting a video of actual game play in my classes shortly on TikTok and Instagram and I will update this page with a link when I do, so don’t forget to follow me for updates.

I hope you enjoy it!

Here’s the download link for the PDF :  http://classroomgames.net/materials/tenses-rummy.pdf

 

Categories
A1 A2 Adult B1 B2 C1 C2 Games Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Simple Primary Review Secondary Speaking

Rory’s Story Cubes

As an English language teacher, it can sometimes be difficult to come up with engaging activities that will encourage your students to practice speaking. This is where story cubes come in! They are a fantastic tool for practicing speaking skills in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom. In this blog post, we’ll explore what story cubes are, how to use them in your classroom, and why they are such a great resource for students.

What are Story Cubes?

Story cubes are small, cube-shaped dice with different images printed on each side. They come in a set of nine cubes, with a total of 54 unique images. The images on the cubes range from simple objects like a tree or a sun, to more abstract symbols like a lightbulb or a heart.

How to use Story Cubes in the EFL Classroom

Story cubes are incredibly versatile and can be used in a variety of ways in the EFL classroom. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Speaking Practice:

One of the best ways to use story cubes is for speaking practice. Have your students roll the cubes and use the images they see to create a story. They can work in pairs or small groups to create a story together, taking turns to add new elements to the story. This is a great way to encourage your students to use English in a creative and relaxed environment.

Vocabulary Practice:

Another way to use story cubes is for vocabulary practice. Give your students a specific vocabulary set, such as action verbs or adjectives, and have them use the cubes to create sentences that incorporate these words. This is a fun way to reinforce vocabulary and help students to use new words in context.

Grammar Practice:

You can also use story cubes to practice grammar structures. For example, you could ask your students to create sentences using the present simple or present continuous tense, depending on the images they see on the cubes. This is a great way to practice grammar in a fun and engaging way.

Why are Story Cubes a Great Resource for EFL Students?

There are many reasons why story cubes are a great resource for students. Here are a few:

They Encourage Creativity:

Story cubes encourage students to be creative and to use their imagination. This is a great way to encourage students to think outside the box and to use English in a fun and engaging way.

They Foster Collaboration:

When students work together to create a story using the cubes, they have to collaborate and communicate with each other. This is a great way to build teamwork skills and to help students to work together effectively.

They Are Easy to Use:

Story cubes are incredibly easy to use. They require no preparation or advanced technology, making them a great resource for both teachers and students.

They Are Portable:

Because story cubes are small and lightweight, they are incredibly portable. You can take them with you wherever you go, making them a great resource for EFL teachers on the go.

Story cubes are a fantastic tool for practicing speaking skills in the classroom. They are versatile, easy to use, and encourage creativity and collaboration. Whether you use them for speaking practice, vocabulary practice, or grammar practice, story cubes are a great resource for students and teachers alike. So why not give them a try in your next class and see how they can enhance your students’ speaking skills!

Rory’s Story Cubes on Amazon (affiliate link) : https://amzn.to/3HmsfUb

 

Categories
A1 A2 Adult B1 B2 C1 C2 Games Past Simple Present Simple Primary Review Secondary Speaking

One Night Werewolf

This is a review of a game which I use in class and I find particularly good for students to encourage speaking. It’s a type of game called a ‘hidden role’ game called One Night Werewolf. At the end of this post are 2 free themed downloadable adaptations of this game that I have made too.

It is by Bezier Games and you can buy a copy of it from here : https://amzn.to/3DqGjuC (this is an affiliate link that will support this site if you use it) or alternatively, if all your students have mobiles, you can play it online for free here : https://netgames.io/games/onu-werewolf/

How to play

The object of the game is to find out who is the Werewolf. There are two phases in the game, the night phase and the day phase. The night phase is first, followed by the day phase.

All students take a character card and there are 3 cards in the middle of the table. Each character has a different action during the night phase of the game and they do it in a set order as follows:

  • Werewolf – First checks if there are other werewolves. If there are not, they may look at 1 card from the centre.
  • Seer – Can look at one other player’s card, or 2 of the centre cards.
  • Robber – Changes their own card with another player’s card, then looks at their new card.
  • Troublemaker – swaps the cards of two other players. Doesn’t look at anything.
  • Drunk – Swaps their own card with one from the centre, but cannot look at the new card.
  • Insomniac – After all other actions have been done, they are allowed to look at their own card again to see if it has been changed.
  • Villager – Has no action.

There are other characters, but these are the main ones. Once you have played the game a few times, you might want to start adding more, but to start with, these are complcated enough!

Night phase

At the beginning of the night phase, all students close their eyes. There is a recording that plays on the accompanying app that you can play on a mobile phone, which tells each character when they should open their eyes, what they should do, and when to close their eyes again. It’s important that nobody cheats!

If you are using the mobile app, it does everything for you on the screen.

Day phase

Once the night phase is over, the day phase is a timed period – usually about 3 minutes, but you can set it as short or long as you like – where students can discuss who they are and what they did during the night.

At the end of the designated time period all players vote on who is the werewolf.

During the discussion, students might say thigs like… “I am the robber and I changed my card with…. and my new card was…” or “I was the Seer and I looked at 2 cards from the middle. They were the Robber and Villager.”

The werewolf must try not to be discovered, and the other players must try to discover who is the werewolf. The werewolf must therefore listen to other players and try and make up a plausible lie, whereas all the other players must listen to try and figure out who is lying.

It’s important that noone looks at their cards at all until after the discussion has finished and voting has been done.

It’s a great game for students from about 10 years old upwards. I’ve used it with 8 year-olds with some success, but it’s not usual for children of this age to have developed the mental skills to understand these types of games.

Free adaptations

I have made 2 adaptations of this game called ‘One Christmas Night’ and ‘One Dinosaur Night’ which are obviously Christmas and Dinosaur themed. You can download the PDFs and the accompanying audio recordings for both of these games on the links below.

If you want to see a video explaining the game, please check out my TikTok account… and maybe support me by commenting, liking or following me on social media (I post on Instagram a little less regularly too). I post videos about all the new materials as and when I upload them.

Enjoy! 🙂


Downloadable files

Categories
A2 Adult B1 B2 C1 C2 Materials Secondary writing

Writing Memes

This activity is good for teenaged students with an intermediate level, though it can be used with lower level learners if adapted.

The idea of the activity is for students to read and write short, funny texts for the photos given. All photos and examples, along with instructions are included in the attached PDF file.

This reading and writing activity should last for about an hour, though you may stretch it to 90 or 120 minutes.

I hope it’s useful and please leave a comment to let me know how you have used it, if it was successful or to make any suggestions to improve it.

 

Download : http://classroomgames.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Memes.pdf